27.11.2014

Black Sea Container Market Review 9m 2014

Black Sea container terminals of Ukraine, Romania, Russia, and Bulgaria handled 1 977 734 TEU for 9m 2014, including empty containers, excluding transshipment.
This review observes only full containers of the region – 1 400 576 TEU. Total growth reached by these five countries for the period is 3,02% compared to the same period last year.

 

In 9 m 2014 general increase in laden containers was 3,02%

 

Black Sea region turnover, m9 2013 and 9m 2014, TEU, full

 

The largest increases were in Georgia and Romania, respectively. For Bulgaria and Russia growth was smaller and even negative for Ukraine.

 

Full containers turnover by countries, TEU

Country 9m 2013, TEU full 9m 2014, TEU full Growth,%
Ukraine 464 268 418 621 -9,83%
Russia 342 019 363 935 6,41%
Romania 284 698 315 405 10,79%
Georgia 164 197 189 292 15,28%
Bulgaria 104 329 113 323 8,62%
Total 1 359 511 1 400 576 3,02%

 

During this period, 58,86% of the full containers handled were imported, with 41,14% of the volume being exported. It is estimated that 70,82% of the containers were full and 29,18% were empties.

 

58,86% of Black Sea volumes is import

 

Export volumes from the aforementioned countries increased by 10,55% relative to 9m 2013. The highest export growth was reached by Russia – 22,89% and Georgia – 16,6%. Other countries showed smaller growth, Bulgaria – 11,59%, Ukraine – 8,68% and Romania 6,38%. Import volumes for the period decreased 1,66%, mostly due to rapid decrease in Ukraine -22,09%, all other countries showed increase in impot, even Russia, with a small 1,51% of growth.

 

Thus the percentage of volume handled by each country distributed as follows: Ukraine – 25,4%, Russia (Black Sea) – 27,7%, Romania – 22,51%, Georgia – 17,7%, Bulgaria – 7,22%.

 

Black Sea countries shares by full containers turnover, 9m 2014

 

The top-five container terminals of the region for 9m 2014 by positions in total volumes handled: DPW (Constanta, Romania), APMT Poti (Georgia), Novoroslesexport (Novorossyisk, Russia), NUTEP (Novorossiysk, Russia), HPC Ukraine (Odessa, Ukraine). All of them showed decrease except DPW and Poti.
 
Black Sea Container Terminals shares by total turnover, 9m 2014

 

As for the Lines in the region, the leaders remained the same: MSC, Maersk Line, CMA CGM, ZIM and ARKAS. Mentioned carriers control 71,62% of this market.
MSC, Maersk Line, CMA CGM, ZIM and ARKAS controls 71,62% of Black Sea market

 

Source: Infomall B.G.

22.06.2014

Container Shipping Geography in Ukraine 2013

The information on changes in the geographical structure of Ukrainian Container Trades is very important for all markets, especially at the end of the year.

In this article Informall details the trade volumes for the Ukrainian market. The analysis is based on the ports of loading and ports of destination data, and excludes transshipment ports.

The general tendency for all Ukrainian container terminals – an increase in Far East and South East Asian trade, both in exports and imports.

Far East and South East Asian trade always dominates amongst all Ukrainian partners. This year, their share was 69% of all imports for Ukrainian container terminals.

The share of Far East and South East Asian trade varies for each container terminal. It is 84% in Ilyichevsk and 68% in Odessa, due to a larger share for other traders, in particular the second-largest, –the Mediterranean, including Turkey.

TIS, (Yuzhniy), had handled mostly South American trades, before starting to handle Far East and South East Asia trade as well. The opportunity to pass customs formalities without loading on transport unit attracts big importers, in particular the importers of household appliances.

The second-largest trading partner for Ukrainian imports is the Mediterranean, including Turkey, representing 13,38% of the total. The main cargo traffics are: home appliances, accumulators, building materials, household chemicals, textiles, fruits, vegetables, dry fruits, cosmetics, PVC and plastic production.

Trade from South America increased all over Ukraine, not only due to import cargo but also due to transit cargo. During the past three years this trade increased from 4% to 9,24%, becoming the third-largest partner by volume for Ukraine. And its share continues to increase.

The main cargo for South American trade is meat and fish products in refrigerated containers. Transit cargo is oriented towards Moldova and consists of meat products, mainly. Thus refrigerated container turnover increased by 24% in 2011, by 50% in 2012, and in 2013 the total increase is estimated to be 9% by the end of the year.

The other import and transit trades compose 4,65% in total turnover. The structure of Ukrainian import and transit container trade in 2013 is illustrated by the following table.

As for export/transit, the Far East and South East Asian destinations again dominate. They compose 64,98% of the total, which is 10% higher than in 2011. The main cargo to these destinations are different wooden materials, plywood, logs, agricultural production (wheat, rape seeds, sunflower oil) and chemical products as well.

Indian Subcontinent destination places second, with a market share of 14,42%. The main cargo to this destination is chemical and metal production.

Mediterranean trade, representing 11,55% of Ukrainian export and transit consists of wooden products, foodstuff and agricultural production.

The structure of export destinations from Ukraine is more or less similar for every terminal. In Odessa and Ilyichevsk all the trade takes similar shares and consists of the same cargo. At TIS container terminal, despite only ECUMED service from Maersk, all the trades similar to Odessa and Ilyichevsk were handled. And their volumes are increasing due to the stuffing capacity at the terminal.

http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/262ce8ac-f7ef-4e88-9a95-f358664a27e6/

22.06.2014

Ukrainian ports overcapacity crisis

Ukrainian ports are continuing to under-perform because of huge capacity surplus, which a new report says there is no quick solution for.

The problem is that although capacity is up to 3m teu in 2014, supply only stands at 778,000 teu, according to 2013 figures.

Andrey Sokolov, projeсt manager, Informall, told Port Strategy: “If it were possible to return the traffic in the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea ports it would give Ukrainian ports an extra 100,000 teu, it would not solve the problem of overcapacity, but might increase container flow short term.”

The overcapacity crisis has many roots, some of them coming from a time of rapid development before the financial crisis of 2008, when many port development plans were approved.

Mr Sokolov said that there were container terminal projects on the table worth around 43m teu, but they have not come to fruition.

The study also revealed that the prospect of the P3 alliance holds missed blessings when it comes to dealing with overcapacity issues. But it will have a clear effect on ports because together, P3 provides more than 51% of container traffic through Ukrainian ports.

At Odessa, the Hamburg Port Consulting (HPC) terminal is expanding and doing quite well. Competing for attraction of lines and being one of the most productive terminals with expansion underway allows it to have a free window for berthing.

But the P3 alliance prospect could see it losing business to the neighbouring Brooklyn-Kiev Port (BKP) terminal – whose main client is CMA CGM, one of the partners in the alliance.

The TransInvestServis (TIS) container terminal at Yuzhniy port, partnered with Maersk, has shown 80% growth and will be another P3 contender because it has better navigational conditions and three STS super post-panama cranes.

P3 alliance aside, there are other issues to contend with. Container Terminal Illichevsk (CTI) is losing share due to having absence of funds to invest into a new terminal.

And even though it’s a cheaper option, the nearby Illychevsk fish port, where everything is ready for container handling, stands empty.

Mr Sokolov pointed out that the long term solution to the overcapacity crisis would be to increase of container transit to Russia. But this all down to Ukrainian customs performance at the border with Russia and the will of Russia to develop its own facilities in Novorossiysk and the construction of the new port, Taman.

http://www.portstrategy.com/news101/world/europe/ukrainian-ports-over-capacity-crisis/_nocache

22.06.2014

(Russian) Составлен рейтинг контейнерных терминалов и линий Черноморского региона по итогам 2013 года (таблица)

Sorry, this entry is only available in Russian.

22.06.2014

Black Sea Container Market Review 2013

Black Sea container terminals of Ukraine, Romania, Russia, and Bulgaria handled 2 636 998 TEU for 2013, including empty containers, excluding transshipment. This review observes only full containers of the region – 1 842 866 TEU. Total growth reached by these five countries for the period is 12,01% compared to the same period last year.

BlackSea_turnoverIn 2013 general increase in laden containers was 12,01%.

The largest increases were in Ukraine and Romania, respectively. Although Bulgaria was down for the first half of 2013, they ended showing slight gains over year period.

 

 

 

Full containers turnover by countries, TEU

Country 2013, TEU full 2012, TEU full Growth,%
Ukraine 530 177 634 359 19,65%
Russia 441 557 460 570 4,31%
Romania 335 149 381 135 13,72%
Georgia 204 390 225 756 10,45%
Bulgaria 134 069 141 046 5,20%
Total 1 645 342 1 842 866 12,01%

During this period, 61,35% of the full containers handled were imported, with 38,65% of the volume being exported. It is estimated that 69,88% of the containers were full and 30,12% were empties.

61,35% of Black Sea volumes is import

Export volumes from the aforementioned countries increased by 19,33% relative to 2012. The highest export growth was reached by Ukraine – 50,13% and Romania – 22,97%. Export volumes decreased in Russia – 17,28%, and in Georgia and Bulgaria was a small increase. Imports to the region increased by 7,84%, thanks mainly to Russian volumes – 13,17%. Import volumes for the period increased almost in all countries except Romania.

Ukraine had a record increase of full export volumes – 50,13%
Thus the percentage of volume handled by each country distributed as follows:  Ukraine – 34,42%, Russia (Black Sea) – 24,99%, Romania – 20,68%, Georgia – 12,25%, Bulgaria – 7,65%.

BlackSea_shares_containersBlack Sea countries shares by full containers turnover, 2013

The top-five container terminals of the region for 2013 didn’t change their positions in total volumes handled: DPW (Constanta, Romania), HPC Ukraine (Odessa, Ukraine), Novoroslesexport (Novorossyisk, Russia), CTI (Ilyichevsk, Ukraine), APMT Poti (Georgia).  All of them showed growth with the exception of CTI (Ilyichevsk, Ukraine).

 

 

Black Sea Container Terminals shares by total turnover, 2013

As for the Lines in the region, the leaders remained the same: MSC, Maersk Line, ZIM and CMA CGM. Mentioned carriers control 63,35% of this market.

MSC, Maersk Line, ZIM и CMA CGM controls 63,35% of Black Sea market

Lines’ shares in the Black Sea region by full containers turnover, 2013 

Starting from the middle of September 2013 the service of former G6 was re-built (Hapag Lloyd, OOCL, MOL, NYK, HMM, APL).  Nevertheless its members managed to increase their total market share for the period from 8,32% to 10,11%.

http://www.trans-port.com.ua/index.php?newsid=51221